Bassett Family Association Database

James Edward Bass

Male 1832 - 1916  (83 years)


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  • Name James Edward Bass 
    Born 27 Apr 1832  Surry County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _UID 2F58ECB7B791CF4691E51B9658E52DC5DD2F 
    Died 28 Feb 1916  Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Dayton Cemetery, Dayton, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • The Biographical Record of Webster County, Iowa
      James Bass
      Prominent among the citizens of Webster County who have witnessed the marvelous development of this section of the state in the last half century, and how have, by honest toil and industry succeeded in acquiring a competence, and are now able to spend the sunset of life in quiet and retirement, is the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch. For many years he was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits, but is now living a retired life in Dayton.
      Mr. Bass was born in North Carolina April 27, 1832, a son of Edward and Mary (Saffley) Bass, who were of German descent. His paternal grandfather fought for American independence in the Revolutionary War, and participated in the Battle of Bunker Hill. From North Carolina the family removed to Indiana when our subject was three years old, and in 1855 his parents came to Iowa, purchasing a farm of two hundred and forty acres of land in Boone county and later forty acres of timber land. The father, was was born January 17, 1789, died February 3, 1883, and the mother passed away July 15, 1886.
      This worthy couple were the parents of the following named children: Jesse married Polly Landreth and both died in Boone County; Patsey became the wife of Fennel Landreth and both are now deceased; Hannah married Thomas Landreth and they spent their last days in Webster County; Matilda is the widow of Matt Cole and makes her home at Mineral Ridge; Betsey married David Spark, of Boone County, and both are now deceased; James is the next of the family; John married Maggie Getzman and lives in Ogden, Boone County; Sarah first married Jesse Maguire and second David Landreth and died at Missouri Valley Junction; David married Maggie Conrad and they reside near Boone; and Rachel, deceased, was the wife Cyrus Haller.
      James Bass was reared and educated in Owen County, Indiana, pursuing his studies at a subscription school, the building being made of logs. He laid aside his books at the age of fourteen, and then assisted his father in the operation of the home farm until he attained his majority. In the fall of 1852 he came to Webster County, Iowa, and by working as a farm hand managed to secure enough capital to purchase eighty acres of government land, for which he paid from one dollar and a quarter to one dollar and a half per acres. This was situated seven miles northeast of Dayton and became his homestead.
      In 1857 Mr. Bass was married in Boone County, Iowa, to Miss Cassie Halloway, who was also born in North Carolina, March 24, 1837, and died February 3, 1901. Her parents were natives of North Carolina, and there the mother died, but the father came to Boone County, Iowa, and made his home with our subject until his second marriage just before the Civil War. He died in February, 1881, and was buried in Beem Cemetery, Webster County. By his first union he had six children, four sons and two daughters, but Elizabeth, wife of William Fry, of Ell Township, Webster County, is the only one now living. Two sons were killed and another died while taking part in the Civil War.
      Mr. Bass had nine children, namely: (1) Mary Jane is now the wife of Taylor Scott, of Gowrie and has seven children, Hubert, Nellie, Grace, Clifton, Cassie, Wilson and Leo; (2) Rachel A. is with her father; (3) Addie is the wife of Thomas Bragg, a farmer of Gowrie and their children are Alva and Mina; (4) Sherman, a resident of Dayton, married Julia Casebolt and has three children, Orville, Effie and Fay; (5) Grant married Cora Guthrie and has two children. Halsey and Sylva; (6) Miles, a farmer of Yell Township, married Jennie Nelson and has two children, Raymond and Marie; (7) Mina and (8) Elsie are both at home with their father. (9) Ella is the wife of Dr. L.E. Estick of Rockwell City, and they have one child, Lewis Howard.
      There was an Indian scare in this section of the state right after the Spirit Lake massacre and about three hundred men, including Mr. Bass, organized under the command of Johonson McFarland and Joe Thrift for the purpose of defending the settlers. They marched from Boonesboro to Hooks Point and on to Homer, and from the last named place were ordered to Webster City, where they spent three days and nights. The companies were then disbanded and the men returned to their homes.
      In 1863, Mr. Bass volunteered to fight against the Indians under Captain Williams of Fort Dodge and went to Chain Lake on the boundary line between Iowa and Minnesota, where they established barracks, building stockades and several houses with port holes, thorugh which they could fire on the red men and still be protected. At that time there were two other posts between Chain Lake and Spirit Lake, Captain Ingrams being in command of one of these, and each day during the entire time spent there communication passed from one post to the other. At the end of six months the company marched back to Fort Dodge and was disbanded.
      Mr. Bass joined the regular service in 1864, enlisting on the 18th of November, in Company K, Sixteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Stattman. Being too late to join General Sherman on the march to the sea, they were ordered to Nashville, and on arriving in that city were quartered on the seventh story of the Jolly Coffer House, where they spent the night and were given a very poor supper and breakfast. The next morning the company to which our subject belonged was detached from the regiment and its members assigned to different regiments, Mr. Bass becoming a member of the One Hundred and Thirty-second New York Infantry. As soon as he drew his gun he was placed on the picket line and bullets were flying thickly about him in less that two hours. He was detailed as guard at Fort Negley one day and night, and at Fort Lookout the following day and night. He saw a negro brigade make a charge on the rebels, and then shell the woods all one night. The soldiers were often compelled to wade in the swamps around Nashville where the water was almost neck deep, although the weather was bitter cold, it being between Christmas and New Years, and would make piles of rails and brush on which to stand in order to keep out of the water. When Hood was driven out of Nashville the Union troops went in pursuit, but their supplies were cut off by the rebels and for seven days had only two days‚?? rations. On the night of the seventh day, Mr. Bass and his messmates secured three ears of corn when the mules were fed, and parched one-half of the amount for their supper, saving the remainder for breakfast next morning. The same evening our subject noticed one man eating a piece of raw backbone as he was marching along, so famished had the soldiers became. Mr. Bass and his comrade marched all that day with nothing to eat except the ear and half of corn which they shared between them. Our subject participated in the battles of Kingston and Goldsboro, North Carolina, and at the latter place rejoined his old regiment under the command of General Sherman. With his command he next marched to Raleigh, where they remained two weeks before Johnston finally surrendered, and then took part in a two days‚?? review at that place. They proceeded to Washington, D.C., by way of Richmond, and took part in the grand review in the capital city. With his command Mr. Bass then went to Louisville, Kentucky, where he remained until discharged from the service July 19, 1865. Fortunately he was never wounded, but during the battle of Louisa Fords a bullet split the rail he was carrying for breastworks between his hands and almost knocked him over. Besides the battled mentioned he took part in a number of minor engagements, and was always found at his post of duty, valiantly defending the old flag and the cause it represented.
      After his return home Mr. Bass engaged in farming until March, 1896, when he laid aside active labor and removed to Dayton. In business affairs he has steadily prospered and is today the owner of eight hundred acres of valuable land in Webster County. He also owns the American House; half a business block north of the hotel; and other property in Dayton, including a nice residence on Main street, where he makes his home. He also has a business lot in Stratford, Hamilton County. Although now nearly seventy years of age he has never made a deed or given a mortgage, but is still the possessor of all the property which he has purchased. Starting out in life for himself with no capital his success is due entirely to his own industry, perseverance and good managements, and he well deserves the prosperity that has come to him. Fraternally Mr. Bass is an honored member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and politically is a stanch supporter of the Democratic party.

      Dayton Review, March 9, 1916
      James Bass Passes

      Another of this county's pioneer settlers passed away in the death of James Bass who departed this life at his home in Dayton, February 28, 1916, aged 83 years, 10 months, 1 day. He was born in North Carolina, April 27, 1832, and when three years old, came with his parents to Owen County, Indiana. In 1852, he came to Webster County, and purchased the old homestead in Yell township, northeast of town, where most of his active manhood was spent. On February 27, 1857 he was united in marriage to Miss Cassie Halloway of Boone County, who preceded him to the Great Beyond February 3, 1901. To their union was born 9 children, three sons and six daughters, all of whom survive him: Sherman, Grant and Miles Bass of this vicinity, Mrs. Mary Scott and Mrs. Addie Bragg of Gowrie, Mrs. Rachel Miller and Mrs. Elsie Each of Dallas, Oregon, Mrs. Ella Eslick of Rockwell City, and Mrs. Nina Nichols of San Antonio, Texas. On March 1, 1906, he was again united in marriage to Mrs. Anna Butler of Kingston, Canada, who survives him. He is also mourned by twenty seven grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.

      During the Indian troubles of the early day, he united with a Boone Co. for defense of the settlers, but their services were not needed upon arriving at Webster City, and they disbanded. In 1863, he again enlisted for service against the Indians, and went with his company to Chain Lake on the Iowa-Minnesota boundary, where he served six months under Captain Ingham. November 18, 1864, he enlisted in Company K, 16th Iowa Volunteer Infantry for service in the Civil War. At Nashville, his company was transferred to the 132nd New York Infantry. He took part in the battles of Fort Negley, Kingston and Goldsboro, North Carolina. At the latter point, his company was reunited with Sherman to Raleigh, thence to Washington, D.C., where he participated in the Grand Review of the Federal Army. They were then ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, where he remained until his honorable discharge, July 19, 1865. At the close of the war, he came back to his farm, where he remained until March, 1896, when he came to town, where he has since lived.

      His funeral was held last Thursday afternoon from Grace M.E. church, Rev. Moore conducting the services, and his remains were laid to rest in the Dayton cemetery. Mr. Bass was a man of sturdy character, a leader in his community, and enjoyed a wide acquaintanceship. As one of the early settlers of this region, he helped its development, and he prospered with its material growth. His advice was valued by his neighbors and friends, and he was a trusted counselor in the community in which he spent the years of his activity. His labors are ended but the influence he left among those with whom he lived are lasting. A host of lifelong friends sympathize with the bereaved family in their sad hour of sorrow.


    Person ID I38289  1A William Bassett of Plymouth
    Last Modified 1 Sep 2021 

    Father Edward Bass,   b. 17 Jan 1798 (1788), Surry County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Feb 1882, Boone County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Mary (Polly) Saffley,   b. 5 Sep 1800, Surry County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jul 1886, Boone County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Family ID F13435  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Casanna Elizabeth (Cassy) Holloway,   b. 24 Mar 1837, Surry County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Feb 1901, Dayton, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years) 
    Married 27 Feb 1857 
    Children 
    +1. Mary Jane Bass,   b. 14 Apr 1858, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jan 1918  (Age 59 years)
     2. Rachel Ann Bass,   b. 21 Dec 1860, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Nov 1938, Boone County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    +3. Ada (Addie) Bass,   b. Abt 1863, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
    +4. William Sherman Bass,   b. 31 Jul 1865, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Apr 1940, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
    +5. Grant Bass,   b. 11 Jan 1868, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Aug 1951, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    +6. Sarah Ella Bass,   b. 25 Mar 1871, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1948, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
    +7. Miles Raymond Bass, Sr.,   b. 1 Oct 1873, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Oct 1936, Dayton, Webster County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
     8. Mina Bass,   b. Abt 1878, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
     9. Elsie Bass,   b. Abt 1880, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F13547  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Anna Maria Gates,   b. 14 Feb 1846,   d. 9 Feb 1935, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Married 1 Mar 1906 
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F13548  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart